National News

iStockBy: KELLY MCCARTHY, ABC News

(ATLANTA) -- Popular sandwich chain Jimmy John's said that employees at one of its franchise restaurants in Georgia had been fired after a now-viral video showed them pretend to hang an employee with bread dough shaped like a noose.

"The actions seen in the video are absolutely unacceptable and do not represent the Jimmy John's brand or the local franchise ownership team," Jimmy John's said in an official statement released on Monday. "As soon as we were alerted to the video, we notified our franchisee, who quickly investigated and terminated all employees involved."

The company added that it was meeting with the franchisee to "conduct training to help prevent anything like this from ever happening again."

The 16-second video was taken at a Jimmy John's location in Woodstock, Georgia, according to McClatchy News. In it, white employees can be seen and heard laughing as an employee twisted the dough into a circle and placed his head through it while another held it over his head.

During the clip, one employee told the coworker with his head in the dough that he's been "set to die" as the employee holding the dough above his head pulled the rope-like shape up in the air.

The video, which was originally shared on Snapchat, was set behind a "Happy 4th of July" filter.

On Sunday, Jimmy John's responded to a user who asked the fast-food sandwich chain about the video on Twitter saying, "We have zero tolerance for racism or discrimination in any form. The franchisee has taken immediate action and the employees have been terminated. The actions seen in this video are completely unacceptable and do not represent the Jimmy John's brand."

Jimmy John's was founded in Illinois has been helmed by John Liautaud for 36 years and has over 2,800 locations in the U.S.

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iStock/Marco Curaba(NEW YORK) -- BY: IVAN PEREIRA and JOSH MARGOLIN

The New York Police Department commissioner warned officers of challenges they may face after the city and state enacted several reforms, including a ban on chokeholds, according to a memo obtained by ABC News.

Commissioner Dermot Shea's letter came a week after the New York City Council approved a budget that removed a billion dollars from the NYPD through several measures including removing two NYPD training classes and diverting command of school safety officers to the Department of Education. The state and City Council also banned the use of chokeholds during arrests last month, following the protests over the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minnesota.

Shea noted the department had "strong objections" over the chokehold ban and warned there will be enormous implications for the police officers because of the changes. He said the new laws were "poorly-conceived and -written" and they will make the department's work more difficult.

"We don’t yet know to what degree the state Attorney General or the city’s district attorneys will bring criminal cases against our police officers," he said in the memo. "But we do know that these and other laws make you subject to new criminal or civil liabilities – including for interfering with people recording police actions, for obscuring your shield numbers and rank designations, and for failing to provide necessary medical or mental health care to people in custody."

Shea added that a training module will be created for the officers that will instruct them on how to avoid risks posed by the new regulations.

A spokesman for City Council Speaker Corey Johnson's Office did not comment on the memo.

Despite the warnings, Shea said in the memo that the department's impact in the city is "overwhelming positive."

"We know that the people we serve want and need cops in their neighborhoods. And while poorly-conceived and -written laws absolutely will make our work more difficult, they will never stop us from fulfilling our core mission," he wrote.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- BY: IVAN PEREIRA and AARON KATERSKY

The Manhattan district attorney has charged Amy Cooper, the white woman who was filmed threatening to call the police on a Black bird watcher in Central Park in May.

"Today our office initiated a prosecution of Amy Cooper for falsely reporting an incident in the third degree," Manhattan DA Cy Vance said in a statement.

Vance would not give more details other than Cooper, 40, was issued a desk appearance ticket for an Oct. 14 arraignment on the misdemeanor charge.

Christian Cooper, 57, a Black comic book writer and biomedical editor for Health Science Communications and a member of the New York City Audubon Society board of directors, said he was watching birds in Central Park on Memorial Day and discovered a dog was off its leash and tearing through vegetation.

Christian Cooper told the dog's owner, Amy Cooper, that it needed a leash and tried to lure the dog away from the plants with some treats.

That's when the situation escalated, according to Christian Cooper, who began filming with his cell phone.

Amy Cooper became enraged and started to threaten the bird watcher.

"I'm taking a picture and calling the cops," she says in the footage. "I'm going to tell them there's an African American man threatening my life."

Amy Cooper followed up with her threat, telling the police on the phone that "he is recording me and threatening myself and my dog," according to the video. Officers arrived but didn't make any arrest.

The video, which was posted on Christian Cooper's Facebook page, went viral and Amy Cooper was fired from her job at Franklin Templeton investment firm the next day. She gave the dog back to the animal shelter, however, two weeks later it was returned to her "after an evaluation from a veterinarian and a coordinated effort with law enforcement," ABC New York station WABC reported.

Mayor Bill de Blasio weighed in shortly after the incident became public, calling Amy Cooper's actions "racism, plain and simple."

Robert Barnes, an attorney who says he represents Amy Cooper, told ABC News in a statement that she will be found not guilty in the case.

"The rush to judgment by some in the public, in this cancel culture epidemic, will be proven as wrong as cancel culture itself. She lost her job, her home, and her public life," Barnes told ABC News. "Now some demand she lose her freedom? How many lives are we going to destroy over misunderstood 60-second videos on social media?"

The day after the incident, Amy Cooper issued an apology to Chris Cooper.

"I want to apologize to Chris Cooper for my actions when I encountered him in Central Park yesterday. I reacted emotionally and made false assumptions about his intentions when, in fact, I was the one who was acting inappropriately by not having my dog on a leash," she said in the statement.

Christian Cooper accepted her apology.

"I think it's a first step. I think she's got to do some reflection on what happened because up until the moment when she made that statement," he told "The View" on May 28. "It was just a conflict between a birder and a dog walker, and then she took it to a very dark place. I think she's got to sort of examine why and how that happened."

Vance urged other New Yorkers to call his office if they've experienced a situation similar to Christian Cooper.

"We are strongly committed to holding perpetrators of this conduct accountable," he said in a statement.

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Ovidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, JON HAWORTH, WILLIAM MANSELL, MEREDITH DELISO, IVAN PEREIRA and EMILY SHAPIRO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 530,000 people worldwide.

More than 11.2 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

The United States is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 2.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 129,891 deaths.

Latest headlines:
- 1st LAPD employee dies of COVID-19
- Texas continues record pace of confirmed cases
- Florida records a record 11,458 new cases
- Cincinnati mandates face coverings

Here's how the news developed Saturday. All times Eastern.

6:57 p.m.: 1st LAPD employee dies of COVID-19


The Los Angeles Police Department has announced the first of its employees to die from the coronavirus.

Senior detention officer Erica McAdoo died on Friday, according to the department.

There are currently 287 department employees to either test positive or be exposed to someone who tested positive and are in isolation.

While the LAPD, the third-largest police force in the U.S., has only seen one death, the largest in the country, the New York Police Department, has lost 46 employees to COVID.

5:45 p.m.: Star pitcher says he won't play in 2020 MLB season


Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher David Price said in a tweet Saturday afternoon that he will not play in the shortened 2020 MLB season due to concerns over COVID-19.

"After considerable thought and discussion with my family and the Dodgers, I have decided it is in the best interest of my health and my family's health for me to not play this season," he wrote on Twitter. "I will miss my teammates and will be cheering them throughout the season and on to a World Series victory."

He said he plans to play next season.

Price was expected to be one of the team's top pitchers, combing with Clayton Kershaw and Walker Buehler to form an impressive top-3 in the rotation. Price was part of a blockbuster trade this offseason with he and Mookie Betts heading to LA from Boston.

The 34-year-old is a five-time All-Star and won the Cy Young Award as the American League's top pitcher in 2012.

He's not the only top player to either sit out or debate sitting out the season. Angels outfielder Mike Trout, arguably the top player in MLB, said on Friday he had concerns about playing. Ian Desmond, Mike Leake and Ryan Zimmerman are among the players to already say they won't play.

Team summer camps began on Friday and MLB will open the 60-game season on July 23.

5:21 p.m.: Texas continues record pace of confirmed cases

Texas reported 8,238 cases in the last day, another new daily record for the state. Since June 23, when cases crossed 5,000 for the first time, the state has set a new daily case record six times. Total tests have climbed over that period, but positivity rates have as well.

The state has had 191,790 cases to date with 91,752 considered active. There have been 2,608 fatalities since the start of the pandemic.

There are now 7,890 patients hospitalized statewide.

In total, there have been 2,338,098 tests administered to date with a seven-day positivity rate now at 13.15%.

The increase in cases has caused Texas to close beaches in some locations for the Fourth of July, such as in Galveston, and shut down bars statewide.

11:47 a.m.: Spanish region goes into lockdown

Segrià, located in Catalonia, the northeast region of Spain, will be under a strict new lockdown Saturday after an increase in new COVID-19 cases, Catalan regional president Quim Torra announced Saturday.

Residents in Segrià, which includes the city of Lleida, will be confined to their homes and only allowed to leave for work if they have a certificate from their employer, according to the announcement. There were 3,706 cases in the Lleida region on Friday, up from 3,551 the previous day, according to regional health data.

10:52 a.m.: Florida records 11,458 new cases


The Florida Health Department said the state has 190,052 total COVID-19 cases as of Saturday morning, with a record number of 11,458 cases recorded in the last 24 hours.

The state's overall positivity rate was 14%, which was a slight decrease from the previous day.

Miami-Dade County reported 2,432 new cases, a record high, and a positivity rate of 18.8%, and Broward County, which includes Fort Lauderdale, had 1,359 new cases, a record high, and a positivity rate of 14.1%, according to the health department.

8:58 a.m.: Cincinnati mandates face coverings


Cincinnati’s City Council voted Friday to require face coverings for residents for all indoor public gatherings.

In a 7-2 vote, the council passed the ordnance, which will go into effect on July 9 and mandate face coverings for anyone who takes a cab or public transportation, or shops, dines or works indoors in the city. Violators will be hit with a $25 fine.

Face coverings won't be mandated for outdoor activities, but health officials are encouraging residents to wear them.

The city has seen a jump in coronavirus cases over the last couple of weeks. Since June 20, there were 756 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the city’s health department. The virus has killed 65 Cincinnati residents so far, the health department said.

7:43 a.m.: YMCA campers, staff test positive in Georgia


Multiple children and staff who attended YMCA camps in Georgia, have tested positive for COVID-19, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The camps, which are located on Lake Burton and Lake Allatoona, and being investigated by Georgia's department of health.

YMCA Camp High Harbour closed its two locations on the lakes north of Atlanta last week after a counselor at the Lake Burton site tested positive.

YMCA of Metro Atlanta president Lauren Koontz acknowledged the cases but could not confirm how many, AJC reported.

Campers are ages 7 to 15, and staff are ages 16 to 22.

Georgia reported 2,784 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Friday. That’s down from 3,472 newly reported cases Thursday, which set a record for the number of new cases.

6:10 a.m.: Some Texas hospitals at 100% capacity

Some people in Texas received a jarring alert on their phones Friday evening, saying hospitals were at capacity. The alert, sent to Hidalgo and Starr County residents, asked them to celebrate this holiday weekend "responsibly" by sheltering-in-place, avoiding gatherings of more than 10 people, wearing a face mask and social distancing.

Hidalgo County and Starr County, which are located in the Rio Grande Valley, are home to more than 900,000 people. Hospitals in the region also put out statements that they have reached or are at critical capacity levels.

"Valley Baptist Health System is urging local residents to take all necessary precautions against COVID-19 as our hospitals are at a critical capacity level, like every other hospital across our region," the organization said in a statement Friday. "Our entire team is working around the clock to manage this crisis situation."

The health system CEO Manny Vela said their hospitals are now at "102% and 101% occupancy," according to Texas ABC affiliate KRGV.

Dr. Jose Vazquez, of the Starr County health authority, said Friday that every hospital in the Valley is full and that patients are being transported to other parts of Texas.

"There are no beds in the Valley, Vazquez said, "We are becoming New York," Vazquez said, KRGV reported.

"Unfortunately, we find ourselves in difficult times, right smack in the middle of this difficult pandemic," Hidalgo County Judge Richard F. Cortez said in a statement Friday. "Americans have always risen to the top in hard times. We did it WWII, we did it in 9/11, and we'll do it again today. All it requires is for us to take personal responsibility for our actions."

Texas has more than 82,000 active COVID-19 cases, and Friday's statewide test positivity rate was 13.32%. More than 7,300 coronavirus patients are hospitalized across the state. That number was at 6,900 on Thursday.

States reported over 57,000 new cases Friday across the U.S., which was another record day for cases, the third this week. There were 721,000 new tests Friday, a huge jump and the country's first day of more than 700,000 tests. There were 635 reported deaths Friday, according to analysis from the COVID Tracking Project.

ABC News' Ahmad Hemingway, Joshua Hoyos and Gina Sunseri contributed to this report.


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carlballou/iStockBy BILL HUTCHINSON and BENJAMIN STEIN, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A rash of shootings in Chicago and Atlanta marred the Fourth of July weekend and left the families of three children grieving over their deaths.

At least 72 people were shot in Chicago since early Friday morning -- 15 fatally -- including a 7-year-old girl who was visiting her grandmother on the holiday, according to police.

"When families should be celebrating, having a good time, spending time together, a 7-year-old girl was taken from us," Chief of Detectives Fred Waller of the Chicago Police Department said at a news conference. "A 7-year-old girl who was here visiting her grandmother, visiting her family, and now she's gone."

The shooting unfolded around 7 p.m. on Saturday as the girl, identified by authorities as Natalie Wallace, was playing with other children and family in front of her grandmother's house in the Austin neighborhood on the west side of Chicago, Waller said. Several men arrived in a light-colored car, got out and began firing in the direction of Natalie and her relatives, Waller said.

The little girl was hit in the forehead by a bullet.

She was taken to Stroger Hospital of Cook County, where she was pronounced dead.

"It was a family gathering, so there were many kids," Waller said. "There were kids riding on bicycles enjoying the Fourth of July, as they have should have been, and now this child is gone."

No arrests have been made in the killing.

"Tonight, a 7-year-old girl in Austin joined a list of teenagers and children whose hopes and dreams were ended by the barrel of a gun," Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot wrote on Twitter Saturday night.

Hours later, a 14-year-old boy was among four people shot to death at a large holiday gathering in the Englewood neighborhood on the south side of the city, police said. The child, whose name has not been released, was shot in the back and then taken to Comer Children's Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, according to police.

Police said the shooting happened around 11:35 p.m., when four men walked up to the gathering and opened fire. Four other people were wounded in the incident, including an 11-year-old boy who was shot in the leg and ankle and a 15-year-old boy who was shot in the abdomen, according to police.

No arrests have been made.

A 10-year-old girl was also wounded in a shooting early Sunday morning in the Rogers Park neighborhood on the far north side of Chicago, police said. The girl was standing in a hallway of her apartment building, when just after 1 a.m., a man fired multiple shots from outside and a bullet penetrated a door and grazed the girl's hand, police said. A 48-year-old woman who was with the girl at the time was shot in both legs and taken to a hospital, where she was treated and in serious condition, according to police.

Chicago has been in the throes of what Mayor Lightfoot has described as a "gun violence epidemic."

The latest carnage in the Windy City came after a 20-month-old boy and a 10-year-old girl were among 14 people shot to death in Chicago last weekend, when 40 more were wounded.

More than 100 people were shot, 14 fatally over the Father's Day weekend, and on May 31, Chicago police investigated 18 homicides, the most the city has seen in a single day in 60 years.

Meanwhile, an 8-year-old girl was killed in Atlanta on Saturday night when someone opened fire on a car she was riding in with her mother and another adult, police said.

The Atlanta Police Department said a preliminary investigation found that the shooting happened about 9:50 p.m., when the person driving the car the girl was in attempted to pull into a parking lot and was confronted by a "group of armed individuals" who blocked the entrance.

"At some point, someone in that group opened fire on the vehicle, striking it multiple times and striking the child who was inside," police said in a statement.

The driver immediately drove to Atlanta Medical Center, where the girl, whose name was not immediately released, was pronounced dead, police said.

No arrests have been made in the shooting.

Atlanta police also said that more than a dozen people were shot during a large street party held to watch a firework display in the northeast part of the city. Around 1 a.m., a vehicle struck a pedestrian near the party and a fight erupted between a number of people, according to police.

"The altercation escalated to multiple shots being fired by multiple people," police said in a statement. "At this time, it appears a total of 14 people were struck by gunfire in that area. All victims were taken to area hospitals by private vehicles."

Authorities said two of those wounded in the incident were in critical condition, while 12 were in stable condition.

"At this time, investigators are working to identify all involved parties and determine the circumstances surrounding the shooting," the police statement reads.

An unrelated incident in northeast Atlanta left and man and a woman with gunshot wounds after they confronted a group of people who had been discharging fireworks outside a residence, police said.

At some point during the confrontation, shots were fired and both victims were struck," police said in a statement, adding that both victims were in stable condition at Grady Memorial Hospital In Atlanta.

Police officials said detectives were working Sunday to sort out the circumstances of the shooting and identify suspects.

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ABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Nearly 50 wildfires are burning in the U.S. Monday morning from Minnesota to California.

Some of the worst fires Monday morning are the Soledad Fire north of Los Angeles which is currently 1,100 acres in size and zero percent contained and has caused the evacuation for an estimated 200 to 300 people.

The Crews Fire south of the San Francisco Bay area has burned 1,000 acres of land and is also zero percent contained.

Gusty winds of up to 40 mph are moving into the Western U.S. from northern California all the way to Wyoming.

Seven states from California to Wyoming are under Red Flag Warnings for these gusty winds with very dry conditions already in place.

Meanwhile in the East, strong storms have moved through the country over the holiday weekend from Minnesota down to New Orleans, east to the Carolinas and into the Mid-Atlantic.

Near Charlotte, North Carolina, a tree fell on a home killing a person inside and in Maryland winds knocked down a tree which fell on a home with 20 people inside causing many injuries.

In the Twin Cities, heavy rain caused flash flooding stalling cars on the streets.

Meanwhile, in New Orleans, storms brought nearly 7 inches of rain over the weekend and produced flash flooding.

On Monday, severe storms are expected from Montana all the way to Wisconsin with damaging winds and hail being the biggest threat with a few torandos possible as well.

A frontal system is expected to slowly move through the Northeast Monday afternoon bringing a chance for strong to severe storms with gusty winds and heavy rain.

A stalled frontal system and a tropical wave along the Gulf Coast could bring heavy rain and a threat for flash flooding for the Gulf Coast states over the next few days with, locally, more than 4 inches of rain possible from Texas all the way to the Carolinas.

Elsewhere, a Heat Advisory has been issued from Rochester, New York, to Philadelphia where the heat index could reach 90 to 100 degrees.

Also, Chicago is set to continue its streak of 90 degree weather making it the hottest summer in the city so far since 2012.

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U.S. ArmyBy MEREDITH DELISO, LUIS MARTINEZ, IVAN PEREIRA and ABBY CRUZ, ABC News

(KILLEEN, Texas) -- A woman accused of helping to hide the body of murdered Fort Hood Army Specialist Vanessa Guillen made her first court appearance Monday to face conspiracy charges.

Cecily Aguilar, 22, appeared via closed-circuit television in the Waco, Texas, courtroom to face conspiracy to tamper with evidence for her alleged role in the death of the 20-year-old soldier. The U.S. Attorney's office of the Western District of Texas said 20-year-old U.S. Army Specialist Aaron Robinson told Aguilar, who was his girlfriend, that he killed Guillen with a hammer on April 22 and transferred her body off the Army base, according to the criminal complaint.

Aguilar is currently cooperating with the FBI.

Robinson, who died by suicide when he was confronted by police last week, allegedly enlisted Aguilar to help dispose of the body, and the pair allegedly dismembered and buried the remains in Bell County, according to the complaint. Last week investigators found remains in Bell County. Natalie Khawam, an attorney representing Guillen's family, said Sunday the remains belonged to Guillen. The Army Criminal Investigation Command confirmed the news at a press conference Monday.

"The Armed Forces forensic examiner has determined through DNA analysis that the remains found near the Leon River are in fact those of Vanessa Guillen," Major General Scott Efflandt said.

Aguilar did not make any statement other than to acknowledge the charges against her, and she didn't enter a plea. She's due back in court on July 14 for a preliminary hearing to determine bond. Aguilar is being held at the Jack Harwell Detention Center in Waco, a U.S. Marshals representative confirmed to ABC News.

If convicted, she faces up to 20 years in federal prison and a maximum $250,000 fine, the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

Lewis Berray Gainor, the federal public defender assigned to Aguilar, declined ABC News' request for comment.

According to an updated criminal complaint, Aguilar cooperated with the FBI in the case by allowing investigators to tape a phone call between her and Robinson on June 30, during which Robinson didn't deny any of the alleged crimes. Aguilar also assisted law enforcement in locating Robinson before he was confronted and died by suicide, according to the document.

Guillen's family has called for a congressional investigation into Guillen's death. Nearly 100 lawmakers have also called for an independent review of Fort Hood's handling of Guillen's disappearance. On Monday, the House Oversight Committee announced it has requested a briefing on the Army's response and investigation into the disappearance and murder of Guillen.

While the Army hasn't commented on a possible motive, Khawam previously said investigators told her that Guillen and Robinson had an argument in the base's armory after she discovered his alleged affair with the estranged wife of a former soldier.

The family has also alleged that a man had walked in on Guillen and watched her as she showered, but the Army said it didn't hasn't found evidence of sexual harassment. On Monday, Efflandt said Army CID will complete that investigation and "take actions against those findings."

“Please know that every person who raises their right hand to serve their family in their country in uniform deserves to be safe and treated with dignity and respect to the victims of sexual harassment assault," he said. "We hear you. We believe you. And I encourage you to come forward."

ABC News' Mike Repplier and Ben Siegel contributed to this report.

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ABC News/KABC-TVBy JON HAWORTH, ABC News

(LOS ANGELES) -- A 13-year-old girl has died after a violent carjacking took place while she and her three siblings waited in her family’s car as their parents went into a restaurant to pick up food.

The incident occurred at approximately 2 p.m. Sunday in Pico Rivera, California, when the family parked their van next to a restaurant located near the intersection of Whittier Boulevard and Lindsey Avenue and the parents ran into the establishment to pick up food for the family, leaving the four children, ages 18, 13, 11 and 8, waiting inside the vehicle with the air conditioning running, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

It was then that the suspect, 26-year-old Jose Aguilar, suddenly jumped into the vehicle and ordered all four of the kids to jump out.

“Once the suspect got into the car, the 18-year-old girl fought with the suspect briefly and then she came out of the van,” said Lt. Barry Hall of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department as he addressed the media after the incident. “The doors were open, because he accelerated both doors came open on the van. She got pushed out of the van or jumped out of the van as did her 11-year-old brother.”

The 18-year-old girl and her 11-year-old brother both sustained minor injuries during the altercation with Aguilar.

Aguilar then took off down Whittier Avenue at a high rate of speed of up to 60 mph, according to ABC News’ Los Angeles station KABC-TV, with the 13-year-old girl and 8-year-old boy still in the vehicle.

“The vehicle continued westbound and that is when the 8-year-old boy and the 13-year-old girl came out of the vehicle,” Lt. Hall continued. “Both of them sustained major injuries and the 13-year-old girl died at the scene.”

It is unclear whether the two kids were pushed out of the vehicle or decided to jump themselves.

Authorities say the 13-year-old girl struck a stationary object and died at the scene while her 8-year-old brother was taken to hospital with major injuries. His current condition has not been disclosed.

Aguilar continued driving for several miles after the last two children were out of the car before slamming into another vehicle and attempting to carjack another a car near the Whitter Narrow Recreation Center with a father, mother and child inside.

According to reports, a fight then ensued between the driver of that car and Aguilar when local street vendors who were selling fruit saw what was happening and came to the rescue by ultimately helping to detain the suspect until deputies arrived to arrest him.

“The dad who was trying to buy the fruit jumps back into the car, chokes the guy out and that is when the fruit guys came up and helped him, pulled him out of the car and I believe they actually tied him up and detained him for the deputies," Lt. Hall said as he addressed the media.

Aguilar was then arrested and taken into custody. According to KABC, investigators say that Aguilar had recently been arrested and released on zero bail for felony possession of a dirk/dagger and a vandalism charge and was also on probation for a list of other charges.

The tragic incident has left the community in shock and the family mourning, searching for answers as one of their children is now gone and another remains in the hospital with major injuries.

Said witness Michelle Vaca: “When I found out it was a child, it touched my heart because I am a mother myself and I can just imagine what her mother and father are going through knowing that they lost their child.”

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pkazmercyk/iStockBy ROSA SANCHEZ, ABC News

(PASADENA, Md.) -- Nineteen people were rushed to hospitals in Maryland after a tree fell on a garage during a thunderstorm, trapping them.

Seventeen adults and two minors in Pasadena, Maryland, were transported to five area hospitals on Sunday after a tree fell on the garage where they were seeking shelter from a storm.

The Anne Arundel County Public Information Officer told ABC affiliate WJLA-TV that firefighters believe the group was celebrating a child's birthday at one of their homes when a thunderstorm moved through the area, forcing them to shelter together in the garage.

The National Weather Service tweeted a warning early Sunday that thunderstorms in the area could bring hail and winds of up to 60 mph.

Firefighters said they had to extricate six people who were trapped in the collapse. All occupants were safely extracted within 45 minutes after first responders arrived.

One patient was taken to the hospital with critical, but not life-threatening, injuries.

Five others were in serious condition, and 13 sustained minor injuries, firefighters said.

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Chalabala/iStockBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News

(ATLANTA) -- Armed with rocks, spray paint and fireworks, protesters allegedly descended on the Georgia Bureau of Public Safety headquarters in Atlanta early Sunday, vandalizing the building and sparking a fire that injured two employees of the law enforcement agency, authorities said.

About 60 to 100 demonstrators, dressed in dark clothes and many wearing masks, caused "extensive damage" to the facility, including breaking several windows and spray painting graffiti on the building, according to Lt. Stephanie Stallings, spokesperson for the state Department of Public Safety.

"Fireworks were thrown through one of the windows, causing a small fire in one of the offices," Stallings said in a statement.

Stallings said employees on-site at the time of the attack put the fire out quickly, but two DPS workers were treated for smoke inhalation.

A DPS vehicle parked in front of the building was also vandalized, Stallings said.

The building houses several other state agencies.

Stallings said an estimated cost of the damage to the building is still being assessed.

It was unclear if any arrests were made.

The Georgia DPS oversees the day-to-day operations of the Georgia State Patrol.

The vandalism came amid weeks of protests in Atlanta and across the nation that started with the May 25 police-involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and was followed by the fatal June 12 police shooting in Atlanta of another African American, Rayshard Brooks, after he was found asleep in his car in a Wendy's restaurant drive-thru lane.

Garrett Rolfe, the police officer who shot Brooks, was fired from the police department and charged with felony murder. Another officer involved in the incident, Devin Brosnan, was placed on administrative leave and charged with aggravated assault.

Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields resigned in the immediate aftermath of Brooks' death.

Brooks' shooting came just days after six Atlanta police officers were criminally charged after they were caught on video forcibly pulling two college students out of a car, smashing its windows and using a stun gun while arresting them as protests over the death of Floyd continued nearby.

Arrest warrants were issued for Lonnie Hood, Roland Claud, Mark Gardner, Armond Jones, Willie Sauls and Ivory Streeter for the caught-on-camera incident. Two of the officers, Gardner and Streeter, were fired and the others were placed on administrative leave.

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iStock/koto_fejaBy: JON HAWORTH, MEREDITH DELISO and MARC NATHANSON, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 530,000 people worldwide.

More than 11.2 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

The United States is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 2.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 129,676 deaths.

Here's how the news developed Sunday. All times Eastern:

9:46 p.m.: LA reports 7,232 new cases over holiday weekend

The Los Angeles County Public Health department reported 7,232 new COVID-19 cases for the period of Thursday-Saturday over the July Fourth weekend.

Friday marked the county's largest number of new cases in a single day at 3,187, officials said.

As of Saturday there were 1,921 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in LA County, 28% of whom were in the ICU and 18% of whom were on ventilators.

Officials reported 30 new deaths but said that figure was pending verification and was likely an undercount.

6:55 p.m.: Mississippi health dept. says uptick not tied to protests

The Mississippi State Department of Health told ABC News that it has no evidence to support Gov. Tate Reeves' claim that the state's uptick in COVID-19 cases is related to last month’s protests.

Reeves said on Twitter Sunday that the uptick "began within days of massive protests all over."

When contacted for information to confirm the governor's claim, health department spokesperson Liz Sharlot told ABC News, “We do not have any evidence that an increase in cases is due to the protests that occurred a few weeks ago."

Other states have also reported that they haven't seen a rise in COVID-19 cases tied to protests, including Minnesota.

Mississippi has 30,671 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of July 3, according to the state health department. The state set a record for daily new cases on June 25, with 1,092.

4:35 p.m.: At least 121 students now positive in UW frat outbreak

More students have been identified in a COVID-19 outbreak tied to the University of Washington's Greek houses.

At least 121 UW students, including 112 fraternity house residents, have tested positive for the coronavirus, the university announced Sunday. The other nine students were close contacts of the residents but do not live in the houses, the Seattle school said.

The Interfraternity Council, a student-led governing board for UW fraternities, has separately reported that as of July 3 at least 117 residents living in 15 fraternity houses have self-reported that they tested positive for COVID-19. The university said it is continuing to conduct its own testing and verification of coronavirus cases, which may account for the discrepancy.

A testing site set up near UW's Greek Row in the past week has conducted nearly 1,300 tests as of this weekend, the university said. Greek house residents and others in the community have also been tested at Seattle drive-up sites, Hall Health and UWMC-Northwest, it added.

The university first reported the outbreak on June 30, when at least 38 students living in 10 fraternity houses tested positive.

About 1,000 students are currently living in 25 fraternity houses north of the UW campus. The residents of the houses are being asked to quarantine or self-isolate.

12:36 p.m.: Florida tops 200,000 total cases

The Florida Department of Health released its morning summary which reports 200,111 total cases -- an increase of 10,059.

The department reported this is a positivity rate of 15%, up from 14% on Saturday.

The total number of tests conducted was 66,839.

Miami-Dade reported 2,258 new cases and a positivity rate of 20.3%.

Broward County (Fort Lauderdale) reported 1,670 new cases and a positivity rate of 16.5%. This is the highest one-day total of new cases.

Duval County (Jacksonville) reported 531 new cases and a positivity rate of 16.9%, up from 14.5% on Saturday.

Lee County (Fort Myers) reported 278 new cases and a positivity rate of 14.8%.

Hillsborough County (Tampa) reported 630 new cases and a positivity rate of 16.2%.

Orange County (Orlando) reported 760 cases and a positivity rate of 14.2%, a daily high.

Osceola County (Kissimmee and Celebration) reported 188 new cases and a positivity rate of 16.4%, down from 19.5% on Saturday.

2:08 a.m.: Fort Worth bar faces 30-day shutdown after July 4th protest party

The Rail Club Live in Fort Worth, Texas, now faces a 30-day shutdown after hosting a "Tea Party Protest" on Saturday evening which defied state orders designed to counteract the state's soaring COVID-19 numbers, according to ABC News' Dallas affiliate WFAA-TV.

Owner Chris Polone made good on a promise made earlier in the week to host a protest party Saturday night at the venue.

Masks were required at the door and guests were advised to maintain social distancing and wash their hands regularly. Hand sanitizer was also made available by the staff.

The opening of the bar was a direct violation of executive order Governor Greg Abbott signed over a week ago which temporarily closed businesses that earn 51% of their sales from alcohol.

Abbott said in an interview with WFAA-TV on June 26, that delaying the opening of bars is the one thing he would have done differently in his reopening plan.

“Bars are one of those types of settings that are not made for a pandemic. Bars invites people to gather together, to drink and to have conversations and things like that. And that is the opposite of the type of practices that are needed to slow the spread of the coronavirus,” he said.

Owner Chris Polone streamed the beginning of the event on Facebook live but just minutes after his protest began Saturday, enforcement officers arrived, informing Polone he could stay open, but would lose his license for 30 days. He chose to remain open.

A post on the venue's Facebook page argued the shutdown was unconstitutional because the venue didn't charge admission or "sell" alcohol Saturday.

The post said the state shut down a peaceful protest on Saturday, not a business.

The protest, however, did not appear to be shut down, as it was allowed to continue after a visit from authorities.

12:55 a.m.: Trump claims there will be a coronavirus vaccine 'long before the end of the year'


President Donald Trump made remarks on Saturday evening at the second annual Salute to America July 4th event held in Washington, D.C. and claimed that a therapeutic and/or vaccine will be around “long before the end of the year.”

"I want to send our thanks to the scientists and researchers around the country and even around the world who are at the forefront of our historic effort to rapidly develop and deliver life-saving treatments and ultimately a vaccine.," Trump said. "We are unleashing our nation's scientific brilliance and we'll likely have a therapeutic and/or vaccine solution long before the end of the year."

Trump also said that his administration has tested more than 40 million people around the country.

"We got hit by the virus that came from China," Trump began. "And we've made a lot of progress, our strategy is moving along well. It goes out in one area and rears back its ugly face in another area. But we've learned a lot. We've learned how to put out the flame. We've made ventilators where there were none, by tens of thousands, to the point that we have far more than we need, and we're now distributing them to many foreign countries as a gesture of good will. Likewise, testing -- there were no tests for a new virus. But now we have tested almost 40 million people."

Said Trump: "By so doing, we show cases, 99% of which are totally harmless, results that no other country can show because no other country is testing that we have, not in terms of the numbers or in terms of the quality. And now just like everything else, we have become the manufacturer and record for ventilators. We have the most finest testing anywhere in the world and we are producing gown and masks and surgical equipment in our country we're heretofore it was almost exclusively land in lands in China ironically where this virus and others came from. China secrecy deceptions and coverup allowed it to spread all over the world. 189 countries, and China must be held fully accountable."

6:57 p.m.: 1st LAPD employee dies of COVID


The Los Angeles Police Department has announced the first of its employees to die from coronavirus.

Senior detention officer Erica McAdoo died on Friday, according to the department.

There are currently 287 department employees to either test positive or be exposed to someone who tested positive and are in isolation.

While the LAPD, the third-largest police force in the U.S., has only seen one death, the largest in the country, the New York Police Department, has lost 46 employees to COVID.

ABC News' Ahmad Hemingway and Eric Alvarez contributed to this report.


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iStock/Kameleon007By: BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News

(SEATTLE) -- A young protester has died from injuries she suffered when a luxury car plowed into her and another woman during a Black Lives Matter protest Saturday on a Seattle freeway that has been shut down for days due to the civil unrest, police said.

Summer Taylor was pronounced dead at a local hospital hours after a 27-year-old man in a white Jaguar drove onto a closed section of Interstate 5 where ongoing demonstrations have been occurring and slammed into her and another protester, police said.

Surveillance video captured the 2013 Jaguar apparently speeding down the freeway, swerving around cars supporting the protest that were blocking the lanes and striking the two women walking on the shoulder, knocking them into the air, over the roof of the vehicle and onto the pavement.

"Absolutely heartbreaking. Summer Taylor was only 24-years-old, peacefully protesting for Black Lives Matter when they were struck by a car," Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California, said in a statement posted on Twitter Sunday morning. "Thinking of their family during this difficult time and everyone in the movement today."

The incident unfolded about 1:40 a.m. on Saturday when the driver who was arrested and identified by authorities as Dawit Kelete, 27, of Seattle, allegedly entered the closed freeway by going the wrong way on an exit ramp and drove at high-speed toward a crowd of people protesting the police-involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, authorities said.

"Very candidly, we don't know, at this point in the investigation, what the motive was, what the reasoning was," Capt. Ron Mead of the Washington State Patrol said at a news conference.

Mead said that that according to the preliminary investigation drugs or alcohol were not factors in the incident.

Following the episode, authorities cleared I-5 and warned protesters that anyone caught attempting to march on to the freeway will be arrested.

"The freeway is simply not a safe place ... We feared something like this would happen," Mead said.

Mead said the driver was initially arrested on charges of vehicular assault and felony hit-and-run. Kelete remained in jail without bail on Sunday.

"Those [charges] could be upgraded depending on the progress of the investigation," Mead said.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said in a tweet that "many others were almost hit and witnessed this horrific event."

Prior to news of Taylor's death, friends had established a GoFundMe page to help her recover from the injuries.

"Summer is an incredibly strong and independent spirit," wrote Becky Gilliam, who organized the GoFundMe page that as of Sunday morning had raised more than $46,000.

Gilliam wrote that Taylor worked at a veterinary clinic and added that she was a "bright and caring person who's presence elicits joy and laughter in others."

For weeks, law enforcement authorities have warned pedestrian protesters not to use the highways as the setting for demonstrations.

The section of Interstate 5 through downtown Seattle has been closed multiple times in recent weeks due to large-scale protests.

Taylor was taken to Harborview Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead. The other protester who was struck was identified by authorities as Diaz Love, 32, of Bellingham, Washington, who was in serious condition at Harborview, Mead said.

Love had been broadcasting the protest for about two hours on Facebook Live under the caption “Black Femme March takes I-5.” The video ended abruptly after someone, according to the Associated Press, is heard yelling "Car!"

State police said the suspect continued to drive south on the freeway and was chased by a protester in a car for about a mile before managing to get in front of the Jaguar and forcing it to pull over.

The incident came about a month after a man allegedly drove a car drove through a barricade and brandished a gun at a group of protesters that had commandeered a section of Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood and turned it into an autonomous zone. Following several shootings, police cleared out the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest zone, or CHOP zone, last week.

ABC News' William Mansell and Christina Carrega contributed to this report.


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iStock/MattGushBy: JON HAWORTH, ABC News

(GREENVILLE, S.C.) -- Two people are dead and eight people have been injured after a shooting at a South Carolina nightclub early Sunday morning.

The incident took place at Lavish Lounge in Greenville, South Carolina, just before 2 a.m. on Sunday morning when Greenville County sheriff’s deputies saw a large commotion outside the establishment and called for backup due to “active gunfire from inside the building, according to Greenville County Sheriff’s spokesperson Lt. Jimmy Bolt.

Authorities immediately made entry into the venue and began administering aid to the shooting victims.

According to Sheriff Hobart Lewis, there were several hundred people inside the nightclub at the time of the shooting which was a direct violation of Governor Henry McMaster’s executive order restricting nightclubs and any type of concert.

However, the establishment could have possibly filed for an appeal of that order which would have allowed them to operate but, according to Lewis, the sheriff’s office has reached out to the governor’s office for more information on the matter.

Hobart said that authorities are looking for at least two suspects, and possibly more, in the shooting and that the people involved fled the scene of the crime in various cars. Sheriff Hobart confirmed that they have video of at least two shooters from inside the venue.

First responders transported four of the shooting victims to hospital and the remaining six were transported by private vehicles.

There has been no confirmation yet on the identities of the victims and authorities did not elaborate on the conditions of the eight people injured in the shooting other than to say that they are all in “various conditions” at the present time.

Sheriff Lewis confirmed that a group was performing at the time of the incident and that band members were involved in shooting.

According to the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, no one is currently in custody and police are actively investigating the shooting.

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Myriam Borzee/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL and IVAN PEREIRA, ABC NEWS

(NEW YORK) -- A novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 525,000 people worldwide.

More than 10.8 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

The United States is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 2.79 million diagnosed cases and at least 129,437 deaths.

Here's how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

11:47 a.m.: Spanish region goes into lockdown

Segrià, located in Catalonia, the northeast region of Spain, will be under a strict new lockdown Saturday after an increase in new COVID-19 cases, Catalan regional president Quim Torra announced Saturday.

Residents in Segrià, which includes the city of Lleida, will be confined to their homes and only allowed to leave for work if they have a certificate from their employer, according to the announcement. There were 3,706 cases in the Lleida region on Friday, up from 3,551 the previous day, according to regional health data.

10:52 a.m.: Florida records 11,458 new cases

The Florida Health Department said the state has 190,052 total COVID-19 cases as of Saturday morning, with a record number of 11,458 cases recorded in the last 24 hours.

The state's overall positivity rate was 14%, which was a slight decrease from the previous day.

Miami-Dade County reported 2,432 new cases, a record high, and a positivity rate of 18.8%, and Broward County, which includes Fort Lauderdale, had 1,359 new cases, a record high, and a positivity rate of 14.1%, according to the health department.

8:58 a.m.: Cincinnati mandates face coverings for indoor public gatherings


Cincinnati’s City Council voted Friday to require face coverings for residents for all indoor public gatherings.

In a 7-2 vote, the council passed the ordnance, which will go into effect on July 9 and mandate face coverings for anyone who takes a cab or public transportation, or shops, dines or works indoors in the city. Violators will be hit with a $25 fine.

Face coverings won't be mandated for outdoor activities, but health officials are encouraging residents to wear them.

The city has seen a jump in coronavirus cases over the last couple of weeks. Since June 20, there were 756 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, according to the city’s health department. The virus has killed 65 Cincinnati residents so far, the health department said.

7:43 a.m.: YMCA campers, staff test positive for COVID-19 after camps close in Georgia


Multiple children and staff who attended YMCA camps in Georgia, have tested positive for COVID-19, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The camps, which are located on Lake Burton and Lake Allatoona, and being investigated by Georgia's department of health.

YMCA Camp High Harbour closed its two locations on the lakes north of Atlanta last week after a counselor at the Lake Burton site tested positive.

YMCA of Metro Atlanta president Lauren Koontz acknowledged the cases but could not confirm how many, AJC reported.

Campers are ages 7-15, and staff are ages 16-22.

Georgia reported 2,784 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Friday. That’s down from 3,472 newly reported cases Thursday, which set a record for the number of new cases.

6:10 a.m.: Some Texas hospitals at 100% capacity


Some people in Texas received a jarring alert on their phones Friday evening, saying hospitals were at capacity. The alert, sent to Hidalgo and Starr County residents, asked them to celebrate this holiday weekend "responsibly" by sheltering-in-place, avoiding gatherings of more than 10 people, wearing a face mask and social distancing.

Hidalgo County and Starr County, which are located in the Rio Grande Valley, are home to more than 900,000 people. Hospitals in the region also put out statements that they have reached or are at critical capacity levels.

"Valley Baptist Health System is urging local residents to take all necessary precautions against COVID-19 as our hospitals are at a critical capacity level, like every other hospital across our region," the organization said in a statement Friday. "Our entire team is working around the clock to manage this crisis situation."

The health system CEO Manny Vela said their hospitals are now at "102% and 101% occupancy," according to ABC News Texas affiliate KRGV.

Dr. Jose Vazquez, of the Starr County health authority, said Friday that every hospital in the Valley is full and that patients are being transported to other parts of Texas.

"There are no beds in the Valley, Vazquez said. "We are becoming New York," Vazquez said, KRGV reported.

"Unfortunately, we find ourselves in difficult times, right smack in the middle of this difficult pandemic," Hidalgo County Judge Richard F. Cortez said in a statement Friday. "Americans have always risen to the top in hard times. We did it WWII, we did it in 9/11, and we'll do it again today. All it requires is for us to take personal responsibility for our actions."

Texas has more than 82,000 active COVID-19 cases, and Friday's statewide test positivity rate was 13.32%. More than 7,300 coronavirus patients are hospitalized across the state. That number was at 6,900 on Thursday.

States reported over 57,000 new cases Friday across the U.S., which was another record day for cases, the third this week. There were 721,000 new tests Friday, a huge jump and the country's first day of more than 700,000 tests. There were 635 reported deaths Friday, according to analysis from the COVID Tracking Project.

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MattGush/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL, ABC NEWS

(SEATTLE) -- An overnight protest on a closed Washington state freeway ended with two women in the hospital after a motorist barreled into the crowd, according to Washington State Patrol.

For weeks, law enforcement authorities have warned pedestrian protesters not to use the highways as the setting for protests.

"The freeway is simply not a safe place...We feared something like this would happen," said Captain Ron Mead, commander of Washington State Patrol field operations for District 2, at a press conference Saturday morning.

A 27-year-old man from Seattle is accused of driving his car onto the closed I-5, going around the vehicles that were supporting the protesters, and striking the pedestrians standing in the shoulder of the road, said Mead.

"We don't know exactly where the vehicle came on, but we suspect he came on, on the wrong way of a ramp and entered the southbound lane of I-5, he did not come through on one of the closure lanes we had posted," said Mead.

Interstate 5 between SR 520 and I-90 was closed multiple times in the last 24 hours due to protests.

A 32-year-old woman from Bellingham and a 24-year-old woman from Seattle were hit and taken to a nearby hospital.

The younger woman is in critical condition after suffering life-threatening injuries while the other victim is in stable condition.

The unidentified driver stopped the all-white sedan and was taken into custody for questioning. Mead said the driver passed a sobriety test and there's no indication that the car was stolen.

"At the very least, he is looking at vehicle assault charges, felony hit-and-run, but those could be upgraded depending on the progress of the investigation," said Mead, adding, "We don't know if it's a targeted attack, but that remains the focus of our investigation."

Mead said police have made efforts to keep cars and pedestrian separated during protests in order "to try and avoid this."

"As a result, my hope is the protesters will reconsider their desire to be on the interstate. I cannot guarantee their safety, plain and simple," said Mead.

Police are asking anyone with information to contact the Washington State Police.

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